Ohio Bars And Restaurants Reopening

AP News
May 07, 2020 - 3:55 pm
A man walks through the 5th Street Arcade, a selection of indoor shops closed during the pandemic, Thursday, May 7, 2020, in Cleveland.

(AP Photo/Tony Dejak)

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By The Associated Press

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Gov. Mike DeWine says bars and restaurants in Ohio can fully reopen in two weeks, on May 21.

 

The Republican governor says outside dining can begin a few days earlier on May 15, along with hair salons and barbers. The reopening of eating establishments comes with limits, including parties of 10 or fewer and spacing between tables either by a barrier or 6 feet of distance.

“What we’re trying to marry is the science and the practicality of that profession and business,” said DeWine, who has won praise for his handling of the outbreak.

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SALEM, Ore. — Gov. Kate Brown has outlined a plan to reopen salons, gyms, barber shops and restaurants in the least-affected — and mostly rural — parts of Oregon after more than a month of a statewide stay-at-home order.

But Brown also is cautioning that any loosening of restrictions could be rolled back if COVID-19 infection rates surge.

Brown, who has come under increasing pressure to reopen from rural counties, said on May 15 she will loosen restrictions statewide on day cares and on retail shops that were previously closed, including furniture stores, boutiques, jewelry stores and art galleries.

Counties that have very small numbers of coronavirus cases and that have seen declining infection numbers can also apply to reopen beauty salons, gyms and bars and restaurants for sit-down dining on May 15 with a number of rules and limitations.

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TRENTON, N.J. — New Jersey is sending 120 National Guard members to nursing homes hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic to help staff members.

Democratic Gov. Phil Murphy and other officials didn’t offer details on what their exact role would be. Nursing homes need “some relief from the bullpen,” Murphy said.

The troops will first go to the state’s biggest home, in Andover, he said. The home became so overwhelmed by COVID-19 deaths at one point that it began using what Murphy called a “makeshift morgue.”

Murphy reported an additional 254 deaths in the hard-hit state, bringing the total to 8,801, with about 134,000 reported cases.

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WASHINGTON — U.S. officials say fewer illegal immigrants are trying to enter the country from Mexico amid new enforcement rules imposed in response to the coronavirus outbreak.

Acting U.S. Customs and Border Protection Commissioner Mark Morgan says agents are encountering about half the number of migrants along the southwest border than in the month before President Donald Trump authorized the rapid expulsion of migrants under a March 21 public health order.

Total encounters in April were about 16,700.

The public health order was initially renewed for 30 days and is scheduled to expire this month. But Morgan and Deputy Commissioner Robert Perez suggested Thursday that the public health restrictions may have to stay in place longer even as the U.S. starts to ease quarantine restrictions.

Morgan also said border agents have encountered their first two migrants with confirmed cases of COVID-19. The first was from India and was captured near Calexico, California, on April 23. The second was a man from Mexico captured this week as he tried to enter the U.S. to seek medical attention for his illness.

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JUNEAU, Alaska — Gyms, pools and bars will be allowed to open with limitations starting Friday under the next phase of Alaska's plan to reopen parts of the economy that had been forced to shut down amid efforts to limit the spread of the coronavirus.

Other businesses that were allowed to reopen April 24 — including retail stores, restaurants for dine-in services, salons and other businesses that were classified as nonessential — will be able to boost their capacity from 25% to 50% under plans announced Wednesday.

Starting Friday, bars, gyms, libraries, theaters and other entertainment venues can reopen with limited capacity, state health Commissioner Adam Crum said.

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NEW YORK — The New York Philharmonic has canceled its summer schedule, including concerts in the parks, a tour to China and a residency in Vail, Colorado.

The orchestra had been scheduled for its 55th season of concerts throughout New York City’s Parks in June and for performances at in Shanghai, Guangzhou and Hong Kong in July. The China tour has been postponed until summer in 2021.

The Bravo! Vail Music Festival had been scheduled to feature the New York Philharmonic for the 18th straight year.

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MADRID — The health chief for the Madrid region has quit, a day after the region’s Cabinet voted unanimously to try and accelerate the end of its coronavirus lockdown.

Yolanda Fuentes, a doctor, tendered her resignation Thursday, private Spanish news agency Europa Press and other national media reported.

The Madrid region has Spain’s highest number of coronavirus cases, with 63,870 out of more than 221,000 nationally.

Spain is slowly rolling back its restrictions on movement, but Madrid’s move to ask the central government to be included in the next phase of the rollback surprised many.

The spread of the coronavirus in the Madrid area has slowed considerably, with an increase of just 86 cases from Wednesday.

The central government has said a decision will be made in coming days.

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LOS ANGELES — California restaurants have drafted a plan to allow the industry to reopen for sit-down dining with an array of safeguards while avoiding possible requirements imposed in other states that customers have their temperature taken or the number of tables be dramatically limited.

The recommendations, obtained by The Associated Press, are to be submitted to Gov. Gavin Newsom on Thursday. They envision a changed world within dining rooms, as an industry built on face-to-face contact and crowded tables looks for ways to safely conduct business and avoid the spread of coronavirus.

Tables would be limited to no more than 10 people. Buffets, salad bars and shared bread baskets would be out. Salt and pepper shakers could be replaced by bottles of hand sanitizer. And meals could arrive from food servers sheathed in face masks.

Restaurant dining rooms were shuttered in California in March as part of broad orders to deter the spread of the virus, though takeout and delivery remained. The move devastated the industry and sent droves into unemployment lines in a state with an internationally known food culture.